Currently Discussing ...

Until the Ruler’s Obey (with Clifton Ross and Marcy Rein)

Activists and editors Clifton Ross and Marcy Rein discussed their latest work, Until the Rulers Obey, at Oregon State University on Tuesday, March 4th. Until the Rulers Obey brings together voices from the movements behind the wave of change that swept Latin America at the turn of the twenty-first century. These movements have galvanized long-silent—or silenced—sectors of society: indigenous people,…
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‘All People Matter’ — It’s Time to Raise the Minimum Wage

By Thao Lam.  Originally published on Capital & Main on March 3, 2014. A man wearing the uniform and cap of a fast-food worker, his apron tucked into a pant pocket, approached a clerk at the Alameda County Social Service Agency. As he handed over documents for his public assistance benefits claim, the man explained how it had felt to…
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Blood Avocados, Drug Cartels, and the Crisis of Democracy in Mexico

The majority of avocados in the US come from one single state in Mexico:  Michoacan.  In recent years, drug cartels have started to terrorize the avocado producers there, murdering them, stealing farms, and exacting protection money from the ones that remain. Many farmers have now formed armed vigilante groups, called autodefensas, that have begun to fight back against the cartels. …
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Until the Rulers Obey

Join us for an afternoon discussion with Clifton Ross and Marcy Rein, the editors of the new book Until the Rulers Obey, on Tuesday, March 4, 2014  from 12:00 – 2:00 PM. Until the Rulers Obey brings together voices from the movements behind the wave of change that swept Latin America at the turn of the twenty-first century. These movements…
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Anarchism and the Occupy Movement with Nathan Schneider

In his talk at Oregon State University on February 24th, 2014, Nathan Schneider – author of Thank You, Anarchy: Notes from the Occupy Apocalypse, based on his reporting for Harper’s, The Nation, and other publications – discussed the origins and development of Occupy Wall Street,  a social movement that remains as significant as it is misunderstood. He also explored the…
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Blood Avocados, Drug Cartels, and the Crisis of Democracy in Mexico

The majority of avocados in the US come from one single state in Mexico: Michoacan. In recent years, drug cartels have started to terrorize the avocado producers there, murdering them, stealing farms, and exacting protection money from the ones that remain. Many farmers have now formed armed vigilante groups, called autodefensas, that have begun to fight back against the cartels….
Read more

Transformation without Apocalypse – Episode #2: Susana Almanza

On February 14th and 15th, the Spring Creek Project sponsored a symposium entitled “Transformation Without Apocalypse:  How to Live Well on an Altered Planet.”  The second keynote presentation was given by Susana Almanza. Susana Almanza is the Co-Director of People Organized in Defense of Earth and her Resources (PODER), and is one of three co-chairs for the Southwest Network for…
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Transformation without Apocalypse – Episode #3: Carolyn Finney

On February 14th and 15th, the Spring Creek Project sponsored a symposium entitled “Transformation Without Apocalypse:  How to Live Well on an Altered Planet”   The third keynote presentation was given by Carolyn Finney. Carloyn Finney is a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, where her work explores how difference, identity, representation, and power play a significant role in determining…
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Anarchism and the Occupy Movement

On February 24th, Nathan Schneider – author of Thank You, Anarchy: Notes from the Occupy Apocalypse, will discuss the origins and development of Occupy Wall Street, a social movement that remains as significant as it is misunderstood. He will explore the movement’s strategy and spirit, including its little-recognized religious dimensions, both explicit and implicit. Schneider has written about religion and…
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What the climate justice movement can learn from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr

By José-Antonio Orosco and originally published in the Times of Trenton guest opinion column on January 20, 2014. Fifty years ago, Martin Luther King Jr. won the Nobel Peace Prize. One of the most striking aspects of his acceptance speech is the hope he expressed in humanity’s ability to overcome war. This was no mere idealism on his part. Less…
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