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Soldiers No MORE in the War Against Women: A Call to Men

A Call to Men to Help End the Nightmare of Misogyny by Chris Crass / (First published in EarthFirst! Newswire) There is a war against women, and men and boys are trained everyday to be the soldiers. Misogynist violence isn’t the biological imperative of men. Misogyny, the worldview that engenders, validates, and normalizes violence against women, is beaten into boys…
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Beyond Donald Sterling

Lazy Analysis Leads to Lazy Cynicism By Alexander N. Riccio  Perhaps the Left has become so beleaguered by power structures that any and every effort toward equality or justice is simply discarded as ‘not revolutionary enough.’ The current ubiquitous media fodder surrounding Donald Sterling, racist owner of the L.A. Clippers, has resulted in the obligatory commentary of Leftist publications including…
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Books for feminist men

Chris Crass has a new essay in response to the recent Isla Vista massacre.  In it, he discusses the ways in which men need to begin to confront the cultural violence of misogyny the nurtures the world views of young men such as Elliot Rodgers.  Chris calls on men to engage with feminist theory, in particular: “As men, we must…
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Interviews: Mark Rudd

From 1965 to 1968, Mark Rudd was a student activist and organizer for the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) at Columbia University.  In the Spring of 1968, he was one of the leaders of the student occupation of five buildings in protest of the university’s involvement in the Vietnam war, and its racism toward African American residents in a…
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Interviews: Leah Bolger

Leah Bolger joined the U.S. Navy in 1980 and received her commission as an Ensign from Officer Candidate School in Newport, RI. Her duty stations included such disparate locations as Iceland, Bermuda, Japan and Tunisia, as well as stateside tours in Texas, Rhode Island and Virginia. She received her master’s degree in national security and strategic affairs from the Naval…
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Remembering the Love of Occupy

Documents in the New York Times have now revealed extensive surveillance of the Occupy movement using resource networks that were originally created by Homeland Security for preventing terrorist attacks.  Local authorities in several major cities were regularly sharing information on individual activists and speculating about the nature of demonstrations and protests. Seems like a good time to remember some of…
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The Future of Sex Work

Is sex work a legitimate form of employment or is it inherently a form of oppression?    What is involved in extending human rights protection to sex workers? On May 28th at 4pm in Milam 319, we will explore these questions.   Our panel discussion seeks to examine sex work through the lens of social justice and discuss the intersection of…
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Lessons from what Cesar Chavez did right — and wrong

The recent release of Cesar Chavez: An American Hero, and the premiere of the documentary Cesar’s Last Fast at the Sundace Film Festival, give us new opportunities to reflect on the lessons of Chavez’s life of activism. While his charismatic leadership turned him into a powerful force for justice, an unyielding grip on his position of authority ultimately weakened the…
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Until the Ruler’s Obey (with Clifton Ross and Marcy Rein)

Activists and editors Clifton Ross and Marcy Rein discussed their latest work, Until the Rulers Obey, at Oregon State University on Tuesday, March 4th. Until the Rulers Obey brings together voices from the movements behind the wave of change that swept Latin America at the turn of the twenty-first century. These movements have galvanized long-silent—or silenced—sectors of society: indigenous people,…
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‘All People Matter’ — It’s Time to Raise the Minimum Wage

By Thao Lam.  Originally published on Capital & Main on March 3, 2014. A man wearing the uniform and cap of a fast-food worker, his apron tucked into a pant pocket, approached a clerk at the Alameda County Social Service Agency. As he handed over documents for his public assistance benefits claim, the man explained how it had felt to…
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Blood Avocados, Drug Cartels, and the Crisis of Democracy in Mexico

The majority of avocados in the US come from one single state in Mexico:  Michoacan.  In recent years, drug cartels have started to terrorize the avocado producers there, murdering them, stealing farms, and exacting protection money from the ones that remain. Many farmers have now formed armed vigilante groups, called autodefensas, that have begun to fight back against the cartels. …
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