Videos

Below you’ll find videos from our recently sponsored events.

The Cultural and Technological Impact of Star Trek

As part of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of Star Trek, the Anarres Project presented Dr. Randall Milstein (OSU Honors College and College of Science) discussing the cultural and technological impact the series has had on society and everday life. He discussed the ways in which Star Trek prefigured contemporary technology, as well as the way in which the series maintains a hopeful attitude toward the role of technology in building a future post scarcity utopia. (October 2016)

 


Pollinating Rios Vivos

A multi-media journey about arts, media, and land defense in South America. With original photographs, maps, and short films accompanied by live narration, this presentation shares a glimpse into the communities defending their territories in the face of resource extraction industries.

Presented by the Beehive Design Collective, Movimiento Rios Vivos, Allied Students for Another Politics (ASAP!), the Anarres Project for Alternative Futures, and the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion at Oregon State University.

The views expressed in this and all of our videos are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent the views of OSU or its administration, faculty or staff. The goal of this, and all of our public events, is to serve as a catalyst for debate of a variety of viewpoints on important themes.


Mesoamérica Resiste

On November 13th, we were proud to host two presentations from the Beehive Design Collective at Oregon State University. The first presentation was an analysis of their massive two-part graphic entitled Mesoamérica Resiste.

9 years in the making, this double-sided, folding poster illustrates stories of resistance, resilience, and solidarity from Mexico to Colombia. A map drawn in old colonial style depicts the modern invasion of megaprojects planned for the region… and opens to reveal the view from below, where communities are organizing locally and across borders to defend land and traditions, protect cultural and ecological diversity, and build alternative economies.

The stories in the graphic come from current struggles, but are also rooted in the legacies of over 500 years of colonialism in the Americas. A banner across the top reads, “Every time history repeats itself, the price goes up” – reminding us that we are in an era of extreme loss of cultural and ecological diversity and rapid climate change. Through the lens of Mesoamerica, the graphic tells the big picture story of what’s at stake across the globe with the neoliberal model of “development,” and what we’ve already lost.

The Beehive Design Collective is a wildly motivated, all-volunteer, activist arts collective dedicated to “cross-pollinating the grassroots” by creating collaborative, anti-copyright images for use as educational and organizing tools. They work as word-to-image translators of complex global stories, shared with them initially through conversations with affected communities. You can learn more about their work at: http://beehivecollective.org

This event was co-sponsored by:
Corvallis Rising Tide, the Anarres Project for Alternative Future [http://anarresproject.org/], Allied Students for Another Politics (ASAP!) [http://asap.moonfruit.com/], the School of History, Philosophy, & Religion at Oregon State University. http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/shpr


Visions for Social and Environmental Transformation: An Introduction to Degrowth

Economic growth has turned into the sole goal to guarantee social stability and quality of life in our societies. While ongoing economic growth increases the pressure on the environment and is the main driver of anthropogenic climate change, climate change has turned into a limitation to further growth.

Are we faced with new limits to growth 40 years after the famous report to the Club of Rome? The age of easy growth is over – holding onto it at any costs exacerbates global environmental conflicts and shifts the burdens on marginalized social groups and the Global South.

This is not the whole story: worldwide social movements are experimenting alternative paths for a social ecological transformation beyond economic growth and within the planetary boundaries. Environmental Philosopher Prof. Barbara Muraca introduces the us to the growing worldwide degrowth movement.

The Radical Visions for Another Politics Lecture Series is co-sponsored by:
the Anarres Project for Alternative Future
http://anarresproject.org/
Allied Students for Another Politics (ASAP!)
http://asap.moonfruit.com/
& the School of History, Philosophy, & Religion at Oregon State. http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/shpr


Racism, Capitalism, and the Prison System

As part of the Allied Students for Another Politics! Radical teach in series, Dr. Robert Thompson and OSU graduate students, Zandro Lerma, and Amber Moody discuss the connections between capitalism, racism, and the prison-industrial-complex.  Co-sponsored by the Anarres Project for Alternatives Futures.

Introduction and Dr. Thompson

OSU Graduate Student Amber Moody

OSU Graduate Student Zandro Lerma


We Won't Pay: How Debtors Unions and Strikes Can Lead the Fight for Tuition Free Education

As part of the Allied Students for Another Politics!’s Fall Radical Teach In series, a panel that explores the reasons for hikes in tuition, the explosion of student debt, and how we can collectively lead the fight to abolish student debt and create a tuition-free university.

Co-sponsored by the Anarres Project for Alternative Futures.


Revolutionary Unions and the Abolishment of Wage Slavery

The first event in the “Radical Visions towards Another Politics” Series was a discussion on Revolutionary Unions and the Abolition of Wage Slavery hosted by the Corvallis Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W.).

We will examine the distinctions between revolutionary unions as opposes to bureaucratic unions, the meanings and value of work, self-ownership, tactics to transform society, and existing forms of revolutionary resistance.

Sponsored by the Allied Students for Another Politics (ASAP!)
[http://asap.moonfruit.com/]

the Anarres Project for Alternative Future.
[http://anarresproject.org/]

and the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion at Oregon State University.
[http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/shpr]


Organizing Against Climate Catastrophe

Lara and Paul Messersmith-Glavin discuss the lessons from a recent grassroots organizing effort in North Portland that canvased a neighborhood to determine people’s understanding of their own power to do something about climate change.

In discussing and thinking together, residents began to realize that the climate change crisis offers the opportunity to build a different kind of society.

 

Lara and Paul are board members of the Institute for Anarchist Studies, editors of the journal Perspectives on Anarchist Theory, and community organizers in Portland, Oregon.

Co-sponsored by the Anarres Project for Alternative Futures, Corvallis 350.org, Center for Civic Engagement, the Student Sustainability Initiative, and the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion at Oregon State University.

 

 


W.E.B. Du Bois and the Significance of the Fourteenth Amendment

As part of OSU’s Constitution Day 2015 celebration, Anarres Project co-director Joseph Orosco discusses the significance of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution according to W.E.B. Du Bois.  For Du Bois, the promise of these Reconstruction amendments was the possibility of building a richer more deliberative and participatory democracy in the United States.  Du Bois thought that the moral insights of African Americans would lead this movement to transform America.

 


Science Fiction, Social Justice, and the Radical Imagination

Walidah Imarisha and Gabriel Teodros, with a special video discussion from Mumia Abu Jamal, examine the ways in which visionary science and fantasy fiction can inspire the radical imagination to envision the features of a socially just world.  Check out their work in the new anthology:  Octavias’ Brood:  Science Fiction from Social Justice Movements (AK Press: 2015)


The Future of Sex Work

Is sex work a legitimate form of employment or is it inherently a form of oppression? What is involved in extending human rights protection to sex workers? What is the difference between decriminalization and legalization? 

This panel discussion examines sex work through the lens of social justice and discuss the intersection of feminist critique with the growing global sex worker’s rights movement.

The panelists for this discussion included:  Phoenix Calida, Sabrina Morgan, and Nicole Von Germeten.

Phoenix Calida is a sex worker who lives in Chicago.  She is an administrator for the Facebook group Guerrilla Feminism:  Chicago.

Sabrina Morgan is a sex worker and sex educator from the Bay Area.  Sabrina’s website is here.

Nicole Von Germeten is an Associate Professor of History in the School of History, Philosophy and Religion.


Until the Ruler's Obey (with Clifton Ross and Marcy Rein)

Activists and editors Clifton Ross and Marcy Rein discussed their latest work, Until the Rulers Obey, at Oregon State University on Tuesday, March 4th.

Until the Rulers Obey brings together voices from the movements behind the wave of change that swept Latin America at the turn of the twenty-first century. These movements have galvanized long-silent—or silenced—sectors of society: indigenous people, campesinos, students, the LGBT community, the unemployed, and all those left out of the promised utopia of a globalized economy. They have deployed a wide range of strategies and actions, sometimes building schools or clinics, sometimes occupying factories or fields, sometimes building and occupying political parties to take the reins of the state, and sometimes resisting government policies in order to protect their newfound power in community.

This unique collection of interviews features five dozen leaders and grassroots activists from fifteen countries presenting their work and debating pressing questions of power, organizational forms, and relations with the state. They have mobilized on a wide range of issues: fighting against mines and agribusiness and for living space, rural and urban; for social space won through recognition of language, culture, and equal participation; for community and environmental survival. The book is organized in chapters by country with each chapter introduced by a solidarity activist, writer, or academic with deep knowledge of the place. This indispensable compilation of primary source material gives participants, students, and observers of social movements a chance to learn from their experience.

Contributors include ACOGUATE, Luis Ballesteros, Marc Becker, Margi Clarke, Benjamin Dangl, Mar Daza, Mickey Ellinger, Michael Fox, J. Heyward, Raphael Hoetmer, Hilary Klein, Diego Benegas Loyo, Courtney Martinez, Chuck Morse, Mario A. Murillo, Phil Neff, Fabíola Ortiz dos Santos, Hernán Ouviña, Margot Pepper, Adrienne Pine, Marcy Rein, Christy Rodgers, Clifton Ross, Susan Spronk, Marie Trigona, Jeffery R. Webber, and Raúl Zibechi.

To learn more about the book and/or the editors, please visit:

Clifton Ross’s Page (http://www.pmpress.org/content/article.php?story=cliftonross)

Marcy Rein’s Page (http://www.pmpress.org/content/article.php/MarcyRein)

Sponsored by the Anarres Project for Alternative Futures and the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion at Oregon State University.


Blood Avocados, Drug Cartels, and the Crisis of Democracy in Mexico

The majority of avocados in the US come from one single state in Mexico:  Michoacan.  In recent years, drug cartels have started to terrorize the avocado producers there, murdering them, stealing farms, and exacting protection money from the ones that remain. Many farmers have now formed armed vigilante groups, called autodefensas, that have begun to fight back against the cartels.  Last month, the Mexican government sent in the military to avoid an all out civil war.

Professor Joseph Orosco reviews the history and evolution of the current situation followed by Professor Victor Vargas, professor of international relations, and vice president of Academic Affairs, at the Universidad Latin de America in Morelia, Michoacan.  Vargas discusses what this situation means for democracy in Mexico and the impact that it has on the US, including American consumers and the legacy of the “War on Drugs”.

Sponsored by the Anarres Project for Alternative Futures and the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion at Oregon State University.


Anarchism and the Occupy Movement with Nathan Schneider

In his talk at Oregon State University on February 24th, 2014, Nathan Schneider – author of Thank You, Anarchy: Notes from the Occupy Apocalypse, based on his reporting for Harper’s, The Nation, and other publications – discussed the origins and development of Occupy Wall Street,  a social movement that remains as significant as it is misunderstood.

He also explored the movement’s strategy and spirit, including its little-recognized religious dimensions, both explicit and implicit.   He also shed some excellent light on why Occupy chose to not issue broad demands and what the ‘on-the-ground’ concerns were.

Nathan Schneider has written about religion and resistance for publications including Harper’s, The Nation, the New York Times, The Chronicle of Higher Education and elsewhere. He is an editor of the online literary magazine Killing the Buddha and Waging Nonviolence, a daily source for people-powered news and analysis from around the world. He is the author of “God in Proof: The Story of a Search from the Ancients to the Internet” (http://www.therowboat.com/books/god-in-proof/) and “Thank You, Anarchy: Notes from the Occupy Apocalypse” (http://www.therowboat.com/books/thank-you-anarchy/), both published by University of California Press in 2013.

This event was sponsored by the Anarres Project for Alternative Futures, the Hundere Endowment for Religion and Culture, and the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion at Oregon State University.


Transformation without Apocalypse - Episode #11: Ursula K. Le Guin and Kim Stanley Robinson

On February 14th and 15th, the Spring Creek Project sponsored a symposium entitled “Transformation Without Apocalypse:  How to Live Well on an Altered Planet”

The final event focused on the power of stories and featured award winning writers Ursula K. Le Guin and Kim Stanley Robinson, in their first ever joint appearance, reading from their own and from each others work.

Ursula Kroeber Le Guin was born in 1929 in Berkeley, and lives in Portland, Oregon. As of 2013, she has published 21 novels, 11 volumes of short stories, four collections of essays, 12 books for children, six volumes of poetry and four of translation, and has received many honors and awards including Hugo, Nebula, National Book Award, and PEN-Malamud. Her most recent publications are Finding My Elegy and The Unreal and the Real. http://www.ursulakleguin.com

Kim Stanley Robinson is a winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Locus Awards. Themes in his writing often explore environmentalism, science, and humanism. He is the author of the bestselling MarsTrilogy and many novels, including Fifty Degrees Below, Forty Signs of Rain, The Years of Rice and Salt, and Antarctica–for which he was sent to the Antarctic by the U.S. National Science Foundation as part of their Antarctic Artists and Writers’ Program.  http://www.kimstanleyrobinson.info

The symposium was sponsored by:

the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word,
the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion,
the Hundere Endowment for Religion and Culture,
the Anarres Project for Alternative Futures,
the Environmental Humanities Initiative, and
the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University.


Transformation without Apocalypse - Episode #2: Susana Almanza

On February 14th and 15th, the Spring Creek Project sponsored a symposium entitled “Transformation Without Apocalypse:  How to Live Well on an Altered Planet.”  The second keynote presentation was given by Susana Almanza.

Susana Almanza is the Co-Director of People Organized in Defense of Earth and her Resources (PODER), and is one of three co-chairs for the Southwest Network for Environmental and Economic Justice. She has served on numerous committees including the EPA’s Title VI Implementation Advisory Committee and the City of Austin Environmental Board, and she is a former Planning Commissioner for the City of Austin. She resides in East Austin, Texas.   (www.poder-texas.org)

The symposium was sponsored by:

the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word,
the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion,
the Hundere Endowment for Religion and Culture,
the Anarres Project for Alternative Futures,
the Environmental Humanities Initiative, and
the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University.


Transformation without Apocalypse – Episode #3: Carolyn Finney

On February 14th and 15th, the Spring Creek Project sponsored a symposium entitled “Transformation Without Apocalypse:  How to Live Well on an Altered Planet”   The third keynote presentation was given by Carolyn Finney.

Carloyn Finney is a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, where her work explores how difference, identity, representation, and power play a significant role in determining how people negotiate their daily lives in relation to the environment. Finney serves on a number of national boards and committees including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Orion Magazine, and the Center for Whole Communities.  http://ourenvironment.berkeley.edu/people_profiles/carolyn-finney/

The symposium was sponsored by:

the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word,
the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion,
the Hundere Endowment for Religion and Culture,
the Anarres Project for Alternative Futures,
the Environmental Humanities Initiative, and
the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University.


Corvallis Martin Luthur King Essay Contest Award Presentation

In January 2014, the City of Corvallis sponsored an essay contest for students at the high school level and received many amazing entries. In an event, co-sponsored by the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion, OSU Peace Studies, and the Anarres Project for Alternative Futures, hosted at the historic Majestic Theater on January 22, excerpts from each winners essay were read by Mayor Julie Manning who subsequently presented each student with their awards.


Guerilla to Grandmother

On October 31st, Katherine Ann Power spoke to a standing room only audience at Oregon State University about her evolution from student activist against the Vietnam War, to self-styled revolutionary guerrilla, to fugitive on FBI’s Most Wanted List, to her surrender and experiences as prisoner and penitent, to her deepening commitment to live as a “practical peace catalyst.”

Power was underground for 23 years, much of that time in the Corvallis area. She ultimately served six years in prison and 20 years of probation.

Her book “Surrender” is due to be released soon.


Higher Education in Mexico

Mtro. Enrique Fuentes Flores from the Universidad Latina de América presented a wonderful lecture at Oregon State University on October 30th 2013 that focused on the trends of higher education in Mexico, as well as its challenges.

In a nation with many social and political challenges, universities are attempting to provide Mexican society with professionals who can respond to current conditions in responsive, creative new ways.

But what does it mean to have access to higher education in Mexico? How do corruption and unemployment affect the outcome of the efforts made by universities and teachers?


Liberation Leadership

In a dynamic presentation on October 25th, American social justice activist and writer Chris Crass spoke at Oregon State University on the topic of social justice vision and leadership.

Chris Crass has written and spoken widely about anti-racist organizing, lessons from women of color feminism, strategies to build visionary movements, and leadership for liberation. His book Towards Collective Liberation: Anti-Racist Organizing, Feminist Praxis, and Movement Building Strategy was published in 2013.


Bill Ritchey - The Creativity of Occupy

Social movements generate art, music, and innovative social forms. They open up possibilities for a different future. Bill Ritchey, a founding participant of Occupy Portland, spoke at Oregon State University about the creative activist imagination, the social and political ideas generated by Occupy movement, and how that movement has continued to inspire on-going social justice projects.